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The Shifting Locations of Work: New Statistical Evidence on the Spaces and Places of Employment

Felstead, Alan, Jewson, Nick and Walters, Sally 2005. The Shifting Locations of Work: New Statistical Evidence on the Spaces and Places of Employment. Work, Employment and Society 19 (2) , pp. 415-431. 10.1177/0950017005053186

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Abstract

Purpose - Examines the places where people work in the UK, pointing out that new technologies, such as mobile phones and laptop computers have made it possible to work in far more places than before. Design/methodology/approach - Uses official statistics, such as the Labour Force Survey, the Change in Employer Practices Survey and the Location of Work Survey to analyse where people work and how this is changing. Findings - Concludes that the location of work is changing in the UK, although the number of people working in non-traditional work locations is still small and a large proportion of the people who use their home as a workplace are working in the types of jobs that have always tended to be carried out at home. Reports that the nature of office space is changing with fewer people having an allocated workspace or desk. Notes that there was little evidence available that could show if people were working in locations other than an office/factory or their homes. Research limitations/implications - Indicates areas of research that would give a fuller picture of where work is carried out. Originality/value - Draws together data sources to analyse the extent to which people are working in non-traditional locations.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Publisher: Sage
ISSN: 0950-0170
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 01:49
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/3153

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