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17-ß estradiol administration attenuates deficits in sustained and divided attention in young ovariectomized rats and aged acyclic female rats

Barnes, Philip Andrew, Staal, Victoria Ann, Muir, Janice L. and Good, Mark Andrew 2006. 17-ß estradiol administration attenuates deficits in sustained and divided attention in young ovariectomized rats and aged acyclic female rats. Behavioral Neuroscience 120 (6) , pp. 1225-1234. 10.1037/0735-7044.120.6.1225

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Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that estrogen may interact with the basal forebrain cholinergic system to influence learning. The authors examined whether the loss of estrogen following ovariectomy (Experiment 1) or the disruption to the estrogen cycle during aging (Experiment 2) impaired performance of the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRT)--a sustained and divided attention task sensitive to cholinergic challenges in rats. In Experiment 1, posttraining ovariectomy in young rats did not disrupt baseline performance but did impair performance when attention was challenged by variation in the intertrial interval (ITI) or in the intermittent presentation of a novel distracting auditory stimulus. Administration of 17-β estradiol rescued these impairments. Through the use of a within-subjects design, Experiment 2 revealed that 17-β estradiol did not influence the baseline performance of 21-month-old female rats trained on the 5-CSRT task from a young age but did improve performance when attention was challenged by varying the ITI or by presenting a distracting auditory cue. The results indicate that 17-β estradiol administration can improve specific components of attention in young ovariectomized rats and gonadally intact aged female rats.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Publisher: American Psychological Association
ISSN: 1939-0084
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2017 13:55
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/33164

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