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Impaired systematic, higher order strategies in depression and helplessness: Testing implications of the cognitive exhaustion model

Von Hecker, Ulrich, Sedek, G. and McIntosh, D. N. 2000. Impaired systematic, higher order strategies in depression and helplessness: Testing implications of the cognitive exhaustion model. In: Von Hecker, Ulrich, Dutke, S. and Sedek, G. eds. Generative Mental Processes and Cognitive Resources: Integrative Research on Adaptation and Control, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp. 245-275. (10.1007/978-94-011-4373-8_10)

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Abstract

Cognitive exhaustion is explored as theoretical perspective in analyzing cognitive deficits observed as a result of learned helplessness and depression. According to this view, mild depression or uncontrollability does not reduce motivation to perform, but instead limits the resources available for systematic, higher order strategies of thinking. We report two lines of research. First, using category learning, we distinguish between tasks in which performance benefits from systematic and flexible strategies, and those that equally benefit from simpler fallback strategies. Helplessness-trained persons, compared to controls, are less likely to apply the former strategies. Second, we focus on mental model construction. After learning preliminary materials control participants demonstrated a generative way of thinking. They systematically applied logical rules to construct mental models, whereas depressed and helplessness-trained persons showed little evidence of such constructive activity. We discuss these findings in relation to other theories about cognitive deficits in depression and helplessness.

Item Type: Book Section
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
ISBN: 9780792365624
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:09
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/33607

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