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"Pray or prey?" Dissociation of semantic memory retrieval from episodic memory processes using positron emission tomography and a novel homophone task

Lee, A. C. H., Robbins, T. W., Graham, Kim Samantha and Owen, A. M. 2002. "Pray or prey?" Dissociation of semantic memory retrieval from episodic memory processes using positron emission tomography and a novel homophone task. NeuroImage 16 (3A) , pp. 724-735. 10.1006/nimg.2002.1101

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Abstract

One problem in studying the neural basis of semanticmemory using functional neuroimaging is that it is often difficult to disentangle activation associated with semanticmemoryretrieval from that associated with episodicmemory encoding and retrieval. To address this issue, anovelhomophonetask was used in which subjects were PET scanned whilst learning a series of real words (e.g., prey). In a subsequent scan, the subjects were presented with homophone pairs (e.g., prey vs pray) and were required to choose the one that had been shown previously. In two corresponding baseline tasks, the subjects were scanned whilst learning and recognizing pronounceable nonwords. Thus, while all of these tasks recruited either episodicmemory encoding orretrievalprocesses, only the homophonetasks involved semanticmemoryretrieval. A conjunction analysis designed to isolate activation associated with semanticmemoryretrieval, revealed changes in several left lateral frontal regions (BA 9/10, 9/45), the left middle temporal cortex (BA 21), and in the left inferior temporoparietal cortex (BA 39). In contrast, a conjunction analysis designed to isolate activation associated with episodicmemory encoding, revealed significant changes in the left hippocampus, as well as in the frontopolar cortex (BA 10) bilaterally, the left inferior parietal cortex (BA 40), and the left superior temporal gyrus (BA 22, 28). The present results clarify and extend recent attempts to understand the neural basis of semanticmemoryretrieval, by actively controlling for the confounding effects of episodicmemory encoding and retrievalprocesses.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Systems Immunity Research Institute (SIURI)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1053-8119
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:14
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/35053

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