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Household demand and willingness to pay for clean vehicles

Potoglou, Dimitris and Kanaroglou, P. S. 2007. Household demand and willingness to pay for clean vehicles. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment 12 (4) , pp. 264-274. 10.1016/j.trd.2007.03.001

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Abstract

This paper examines the factors and incentives that are most likely to influence households’ choice for cleanervehicles in the metropolitan area of Hamilton, Canada. Data collection is based on experimental design and stated choice methods through an Internet survey. Choice alternatives included a conventional gasoline, a hybrid and an alternative fuelled vehicle. Each option is described by a varying set of vehicle attributes and economic incentives, customized per respondent. Controlling for individual, household and dwelling-location characteristics, parameters of a nested logit model indicates that reduced monetary costs, purchase tax relieves and low emissions rates would encourage households to adopt a cleanervehicle. On the other hand, incentives such as free parking and permission to drive on high occupancy vehicle lanes with one person in the car were not significant. Furthermore, limited fuel availability is a concern when households considered the adoption of an alternative fuelled vehicle. Finally, willingness-to-pay extra for a cleanervehicle is computed based on the estimated parameters.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Geography and Planning (GEOPL)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HE Transportation and Communications
Uncontrolled Keywords: Alternative fuelled vehicles; Automobile demand; Nested logit; Sustainable transportation
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1361-9209
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2019 09:08
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/37387

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