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Twenty-five years of research on the behavioural malaise associated with influenza and the common cold

Smith, Andrew Paul 2013. Twenty-five years of research on the behavioural malaise associated with influenza and the common cold. Psychoneuroendocrinology 38 (6) , pp. 744-751. 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2012.09.002

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Abstract

Minor illnesses such as the common cold and influenza are frequent and widespread. As well as specific symptoms such as nasal problems and fever, these illnesses are associated with a behavioural malaise. One feature of this malaise is reduced alertness and this has been confirmed using subjective reports and objective measures of performance. Such effects have been obtained with both experimentally induced infections and in studies of naturally occurring illnesses. The mechanisms underlying the effects are unclear but possibly reflect effects of cytokines on the CNS which result in changes in neurotransmitter functioning that lead to reduced alertness. The malaise induced by these illnesses has many real-life consequences and activities such as driving and safety at work may be at risk. These illnesses not only have direct effects on performance and mood but also make the person more sensitive to effects of other negative influences such as noise, alcohol and prolonged work. Countermeasures include ingestion of caffeine and other drugs known to increase alertness.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Upper respiratory tract infections; Common cold; Influenza; Malaise; Mood; Cognition; Cytokines
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0306-4530
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:24
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/38415

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Cited 3 times in Web of Science. View in Web of Science.

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