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Class and lifestyle 'lock-in' among middle-aged and older men: a Multiple Correspondence Analysis of the British Regional Heart Study

Jones, Ian Rees, Papacosta, Olia, Whincup, Peter H., Wannamethee, S. Goya and Morris, Richard W. 2011. Class and lifestyle 'lock-in' among middle-aged and older men: a Multiple Correspondence Analysis of the British Regional Heart Study. Sociology of Health & Illness 33 (3) , pp. 399-419. 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2010.01280.x

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Abstract

Health lifestyles are collective patterns of health risk behaviour that develop within a social habitus. An important area for research is the extent to which health lifestyles become more individualised over time and as people age, or whether health lifestyles remain socially structured. This article presents findings from a Multiple Correspondence Analysis of the British Regional Heart Study. Our findings suggest that smoking and alcohol use retain a strong class patterning as men age (suggesting some support for the long-term importance of social structures in old age). This indicates that, in later life, some forms of class-related health lifestyles become fixed or ‘locked in’. In contrast there is evidence to suggest that, for exercise, class becomes less important as people age (suggesting either some support for growing individualisation and or important ageing effects). Further studies are required to examine different forms of health lifestyle in later life in relation to forms of cultural and economic capital. This study provides evidence in support of attempts to theorise health lifestyles in terms of collectivities. Furthermore, the concept of selective lifestyle ‘lock-in’ may be a useful way of understanding the relationship between class and health lifestyles in old age.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords: class; health lifestyles; Multiple Correspondence Analysis
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN: 0141-9889
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:32
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/40544

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