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07 Incidence of peri-opiate nausea and vomiting in the pre-Hospital setting: an intermediate analysis [Abstract]

Campbell, Gareth, Woollard, Malcolm, McLure, Sally, Duckett, Jay, Newcombe, Robert Gordon and Clarke, Tom 2011. 07 Incidence of peri-opiate nausea and vomiting in the pre-Hospital setting: an intermediate analysis [Abstract]. Emergency Medicine Journal 28 (3) , e1. 10.1136/emj.2010.108605.7

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Abstract

Background Intravenous morphine is the preferred drug for the treatment of moderate to severe pain by paramedics. Nausea and vomiting are believed to be frequent side-effects and routine co-administration of metoclopramide is common. In the absence of pre-hospital data to support this practice, we sought to determine the incidence of peri-opiate nausea and vomiting in an ambulance service which does not administer anti-emetics. Methods This prospective observational study is currently assessing the incidence of emesis in 400 patients attended by the North East Ambulance Service, aged above 17 years and receiving morphine, using a patient-scored Nausea and Vomiting Score (NVS: 0=no nausea or vomiting, 1=slight nausea, 2=moderate nausea, 3=severe nausea, 4=vomited once, 5=vomited twice or more). Results To date 145 patients have been recruited. Median NVS before morphine was 0 (range 0 to 6, inter-quartile range (IQR) 0 to 1): 54/141 (38%) of patients had some degree of nausea or vomiting. Median NVS on hospital arrival (after morphine) was 0 (range of 0 to 6, IQR 0 to 1): 54/130 (42%) patients had some degree of nausea or vomiting. The differences pre- vs. post-morphine in median NVS (p=0.98) and proportion of patients suffering nausea and vomiting are not statistically significant (p=0.98 and p=0.54 respectively). There were no significant correlations between pre-morphine pain score and pre-morphine NVS; post-morphine pain score and post-morphine NVS; pre-morphine NVS and total morphine dose; and post-morphine NVS and total morphine dose (Spearman's rank correlation 0.09, p=0.274; 0.07, p=0.44; 0.10, p=0.25; and 0.10, p=0.24 respectively). Conclusion and recommendations To date this study has found no evidence that pre-hospital administration of morphine is associated with an increased incidence or severity of nausea and vomiting and therefore does not appear to support the routine co-administration of metoclopramide.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN: 1472-0205
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2017 02:54
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/42565

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