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Professionals, quality and the marketing change process

Kitchener, Martin James and Whipp, Richard Thomas Henry 1994. Professionals, quality and the marketing change process. Management Research News 17 (7/8/9) , p. 73. 10.1108/eb028368

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Abstract

The election of the Conservative Government in 1979 heralded a diversion from the post-war, Keynesian public policy model which envisaged incrementally expanding, centrally-funded service provision (Hall, 1988). Largely in response to mounting financial crises, and building on earlier managerialist initiatives (eg. Griffiths, 1983), a new public sector management paradigm began to emerge at the beginning of the 1990s (Booth, 1993). This new paradigm, which was informed by the New Right's ‘public choice theory’ emphasised: fiscal re-organisation, privatisation, the separation of purchaser and provider roles within quasi-markets and the sovereignty of the customer (Butler and Vaile, 1991; Thompson, 1992). These ideological and structural changes are now recognised as a significant break with the past (Fitzgerald, 1993), and even John Major acknowledges the programme as a ‘revolution in progress’ (Major, 1989:1). Importantly, the reformers have often ritualistically, cast aside traditional, public sector and professional values (Pollitt, 1990a; Hood, 1991). In their place, a diffuse set of management ideas have been imported from the private sector. These have subsequently been aggregated and termed the “New Public Management” by commentators such as Harrow and Wilcocks (1990) and Steward and Walsh (1992).

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Business (Including Economics)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Publisher: Emerald
ISSN: 0140-9174
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2017 14:55
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/43130

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