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Enhanced stimulus-induced gamma activity in humans during propofol-induced sedation

Saxena, Neeraj, Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh Daniel, Diukova, Ana, Singh, Krish Devi, Hall, Judith Elizabeth and Wise, Richard Geoffrey 2013. Enhanced stimulus-induced gamma activity in humans during propofol-induced sedation. PLoS ONE 8 (3) , e57685. 10.1371/journal.pone.0057685

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Abstract

Stimulus-induced gamma oscillations in the 30–80 Hz range have been implicated in a wide number of functions including visual processing, memory and attention. While occipital gamma-band oscillations can be pharmacologically modified in animal preparations, pharmacological modulation of stimulus-induced visual gamma oscillations has yet to be demonstrated in non-invasive human recordings. Here, in fifteen healthy humans volunteers, we probed the effects of the GABAA agonist and sedative propofol on stimulus-related gamma activity recorded with magnetoencephalography, using a simple visual grating stimulus designed to elicit gamma oscillations in the primary visual cortex. During propofol sedation as compared to the normal awake state, a significant 60% increase in stimulus-induced gamma amplitude was seen together with a 94% enhancement of stimulus-induced alpha suppression and a simultaneous reduction in the amplitude of the pattern-onset evoked response. These data demonstrate, that propofol-induced sedation is accompanied by increased stimulus-induced gamma activity providing a potential window into mechanisms of gamma-oscillation generation in humans.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC)
Medicine
Psychology
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Publisher: PLoS
ISSN: 1932-6203
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2019 23:09
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/44692

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