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The mediatization of politics: Interpreting the value of live vs. edited journalistic interventions in UK television news bulletins

Cushion, Stephen and Thomas, Richard 2013. The mediatization of politics: Interpreting the value of live vs. edited journalistic interventions in UK television news bulletins. The International Journal of Press/Politics 18 (3) , pp. 360-380. 10.1177/1940161213484522

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Abstract

This article interprets the mediatization of television news generally and political news specifically in United Kingdom (U.K.) public and commercial evening bulletins. We argue that routine conventions (edited packages or two-ways) reflect different types of journalistic interventions, with the use of live, unscripted, and interpretive news practices representing a greater degree of mediatization, since they resemble the style and format of 24-hour media rather than fixed time bulletins. Our content analysis (N = 902) found more live news on commercial bulletins, but all broadcasters exhibited a degree of immediacy and interpretation in their editorial practices. This was most apparent in live two-ways—notably on Channel Five—which produced less source-driven political journalism than edited packages, with political editors playing the role of primary definer. The concept of mediatization, we suggest, can help interpret whether fixed time bulletins conform to their own media logic or adopt the values of 24/7 media.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies
Subjects: J Political Science > JN Political institutions (Europe) > JN101 Great Britain
P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN1990 Broadcasting
Uncontrolled Keywords: television news; journalistic norms; parliament
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISSN: 1940-1612
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2016 03:05
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/45424

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Cited 11 times in Web of Science. View in Web of Science.

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