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The Surrey Virtual Reality System for the (gait) rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy: Pilot perspectives from young able-bodied adult users

Al-Amri, Mohammad, Abolo, Daniel, Ghoussayni, Salim and Ewins, David 2014. The Surrey Virtual Reality System for the (gait) rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy: Pilot perspectives from young able-bodied adult users. International Journal on Child Health and Human Development 7 (4)

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Abstract

The Surrey Virtual Reality System (SVRS) for gait rehabilitation is being developed at the University of Surrey. The objective of the work described in this paper was to investigate the overall performance of the SVRS prior to use by patients. Thirteen able-bodied volunteers aged between 19 and 25 were recruited to undertake five tests and to complete questionnaires to provide feedback on the performance of the SVRS. The tests were: watching two static 3D images; interacting with two virtual reality (VR) scenarios; and walking on the treadmill using conventional speed buttons and a kinematic marker based Real-time Treadmill Speed Control Algorithm (RTSCA) with and without VR environment. The descriptive results suggest that the majority of the participants were satisfied with the overall quality of the SVRS presentation and the feasibility of the RTSCA. For those who found it less satisfactory the core issue was insufficient time to practise with the system. A Wilcoxon test was conducted to examine whether there was a significant difference between walking speeds on the treadmill when using the conventional speed buttons and the RTSCA. The results showed that participants walked at significantly higher self-selected slow and normal speeds when using the RTSCA. This may suggest that they walked more naturally or confidently on the treadmill when using the RTSCA as compared to the use of conventional treadmill speed control buttons. In conclusion, the results suggest that the SVRS is safe and feasible for further work in a clinical setting.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Healthcare Sciences
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA76 Computer software
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Publisher: de Gruyter
ISSN: 2191-0367
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 04 Mar 2019 15:24
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/48607

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