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Ethno-religious minorities and labour market integration: generational advancement or decline?

Cheung, Sin Yi 2014. Ethno-religious minorities and labour market integration: generational advancement or decline? Ethnic and Racial Studies 37 (1) , pp. 140-160. 10.1080/01419870.2013.808757

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Abstract

This paper examines the generational progress of ethnic minorities in Britain by analysing four labour market outcomes: economic inactivity, unemployment, access to salaried jobs and self-employment. An important contribution of this paper is the possibility to examine the impact of a range of cultural and social resources on employment outcomes, namely language fluency, co-ethnic spouse, co-ethnic employer, bridging and bonding social capital. Controlling for ethnic and religious identities, individual, social and human capital characteristics, it finds clear advantages of language proficiency in obtaining employment and salaried jobs. However, the second generation shows little advancement in all the outcomes examined and a particularly strong religious penalty is found among Muslim women. It concludes that persistent ethno-religious penalty experienced by the second generation poses a serious policy challenge and does little to strengthen our economy or in building a cohesive society.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
Uncontrolled Keywords: ethnicity; religion; generation; language fluency; labour market integration
Additional Information: Online publication date: 29 July 2013.
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 0141-9870
Last Modified: 18 Feb 2019 15:15
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/52222

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