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Representations of illness: their relationship with an understanding of and adherence to homoeopathic treatment

Searle, A. and Murphy, Simon 2000. Representations of illness: their relationship with an understanding of and adherence to homoeopathic treatment. Psychology, Health & Medicine 5 (2) , pp. 179-191. 10.1080/713690179

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Abstract

The aims of this study were twofold; to test the reliability of the illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ; Weinman et al ., 1996) with a sample receiving homoeopathic treatment and to examine its predictive utility concerning the extent of understanding and adherence to treatment. Thirty adult patients presenting with ‘chronic’ conditions to homoeopathic practitioners completed the IPQ prior to their initial consultation. At their next consultation (4-6 weeks later), a further questionnaire was completed concerning their understanding of and the extent of adherence to the treatment. The IPQ yielded reliability coefficients of 0.89, 0.78 and 0.64 for time-line, consequences and control/cure, respectively. Causation beliefs appeared as the best predictors of both understanding and adherence. The severity and duration of the condition was associated with an understanding of the principles of homoeopathy and the extent of adherence to it. However, they were not associated with an understanding of the practitioners' explanations of the illness, awareness of its consequences and the extent of perceived efficacy of the treatment, the implications of which are discussed in relation to practice.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer)
Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 1354-8506
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 05:58
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/55263

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