Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Should persuasion be affective or cognitive? The moderating effects of need for affect and need for cognition

Haddock, Geoffrey, Maio, Gregory Richard, Arnold, Karin and Huskinson, Thomas 2008. Should persuasion be affective or cognitive? The moderating effects of need for affect and need for cognition. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 34 (6) , pp. 769-778. 10.1177/0146167208314871

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Three experiments tested the hypothesis that need for affect and need for cognition influence receptivity to affect- and cognition-based persuasive messages. Experiment 1 found that an affective message elicited more positive attitudes among individuals high in need for affect and low in need for cognition, whereas a cognitive message elicited more positive attitudes among individuals low in need for affect and high in need for cognition. Experiment 2 found that individual differences in need for affect influenced receptivity to an affect-based (but not cognition-based) message, whereas individual differences in need for cognition influenced receptivity to a cognition-based (but not affect-based) message. Experiment 3 found that individual differences in need for affect were associated with increased recognition of information from an affect-based (but not cognition-based) message, whereas individual differences in need for cognition were associated with increased recognition of information from a cognition-based (but not affect-based) message. Overall, the studies point to the importance of individual differences in need for affect and need for cognition in understanding how individuals respond to different types of persuasive messages.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISSN: 0146-1672
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2017 12:59
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/5591

Citation Data

Cited 69 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 73 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Cited 43 times in Web of Science. View in Web of Science.

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item