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A disproportionate role for the fornix and mammillary bodies in recall versus recognition memory

Tsivilis, Dimitris, Vann, Seralynne Denise, Denby, Christine, Roberts, Neil, Mayes, Andrew R., Montaldi, Daniela and Aggleton, John Patrick 2008. A disproportionate role for the fornix and mammillary bodies in recall versus recognition memory. Nature Neuroscience 11 (7) , pp. 834-842. 10.1038/nn.2149

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Abstract

Uncovering the functional relationship between temporal lobe amnesia and diencephalic amnesia depends on determining the role of the fornix, the major interlinking fiber tract. In this study relating fornix volume with memory, we made magnetic resonance imaging–based volume estimates of 13 brain structures in 38 individuals with surgically removed colloid cysts. Fornix status was assessed directly by overall volume and indirectly by mammillary body volume (which atrophies after fornix damage). Mammillary body volume significantly correlated with 13 out of 14 tests of episodic memory recall, but correlated poorly with recognition memory. Furthermore, as the volumes of the left fornix and the left mammillary bodies decreased, the difference between recall and recognition scores increased. No other structure was consistently associated with memory. These findings support models of diencephalic memory mechanisms that require hippocampal inputs for recall, but not for key elements of recognition.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Medicine
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
ISSN: 1097-6256
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 01:54
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/5652

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