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Communicating about expected course and re-consultation for respiratory tract infections in children: an exploratory study

Butler, Christopher Collett, Rollnick, Stephen, Kinnersley, Paul Richard, Tapper-Jones, Lorna Maureen and Houston, Helen Louise Ann 2004. Communicating about expected course and re-consultation for respiratory tract infections in children: an exploratory study. British Journal of General Practice 54 (504) , pp. 536-538.

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Abstract

Acute respiratory tract infection is the commonest reason for children consulting, and about one-fifth re-consult for the same illness episode. Fifty-nine audiotape recordings from nine general practitioners (GPs) consulting with children with acute respiratory tract infections were examined. Prognosis was mentioned in only 22 consultations, with GPs predicting a brief course in 11, a possibly longer than expected course in six, and with predicted duration not made explicit in five. Carers were invited to re-consult if they were ‘unhappy’ with the child's condition in 11 consultations, and specific triggers to re-consult were provided in 15. A patient information leaflet was given out only once. Providing carers with an evidence-based account of the likely clinical course and communicating specific triggers to re-consult may help them manage more of these illness episodes without re-consulting.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Systems Immunity Research Institute (SIURI)
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Uncontrolled Keywords: Children; infections, upper respiratory; physician–patient relations; prognosis; patient education.
Publisher: Royal College of General Practitioners
ISSN: 0960-1643
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2017 03:30
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/59585

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