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Adolescent male hazardous drinking and participation in organised activities: Involvement in team sports is associated with less hazardous drinking in young offenders

Hallingberg, Britt, Moore, Simon Christopher, Morgan, Joanne E., Bowen, Katharine Louise and Van Goozen, Stephanie Helena Maria 2015. Adolescent male hazardous drinking and participation in organised activities: Involvement in team sports is associated with less hazardous drinking in young offenders. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health 25 (1) , pp. 28-41. 10.1002/cbm.1912

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Abstract

Aims: The purpose of this research was to test and compare associations between participation in organised activities and indicators of hazardous drinking between young offenders and young non-offenders. Methods: Two groups of 13–18 year-old males were recruited in Cardiff, UK: 93 young offenders and 53 non-offenders from secondary schools matched on estimated IQ, sex and socioeconomic status. Indicators of hazardous drinking were measured using the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST). Organised activity participation and externalising behaviour was measured by the Youth Self Report. The Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence was also administered. Results: Young offenders participated in fewer organised activities and had higher FAST scores than non-offenders. Young offenders and non-offenders significantly differed on mean FAST scores if they participated in no organised activities but not if they participated in at least one team sport. Externalising behaviour problems were unrelated to participation in organised activities. Conclusions: Although young offenders were less likely to have participated in organised activities, for them, participation in a team sport was associated with less hazardous drinking. Vulnerable youths who might benefit most from sporting activities actually access them the least. Future research should identify the different barriers to participation that they face.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer)
Dentistry
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Psychology
Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 0957-9664
Funders: ESRC, Wellcome Trust, MRC, British Heart Foundation, Cancer Research UK, Welsh Government
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Date of Acceptance: 11 March 2014
Last Modified: 16 May 2019 23:06
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/59729

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