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Contaminant mobility and carbon sequestration downstream of the Ajka (Hungary) red mud spill: The effects of gypsum dosing

Renforth, Philip, Mayes, W. M., Jarvis, A. P., Burke, I. T., Manning, D. A. C. and Gruiz, K. 2012. Contaminant mobility and carbon sequestration downstream of the Ajka (Hungary) red mud spill: The effects of gypsum dosing. Science of the Total Environment 421-22 , pp. 253-259. 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.01.046

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Abstract

A number of emergency pollution management measures were enacted after the accidental release of caustic bauxite processing residue that occurred in Ajka, western Hungary in October, 2010. These centred on acid and gypsum dosing to reduce pH and minimise mobility of oxyanion contaminants mobile at high pH. This study assessed the effectiveness of gypsum dosing on contaminant mobility and carbon sequestration through assessment of red mud and gypsum-affected fluvial sediments via elemental analysis and stable isotope analysis. There was a modest uptake of contaminants (notably As, Cr, and Mn) on secondary carbonate-dominated deposits in reaches subjected to gypsum dosing. C and O stable isotope ratios of carbonate precipitates formed as a result of gypsum dosing were used to quantify the importance of the neutralisation process in sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide. This process was particularly pronounced at sites most affected by gypsum addition, where up to 36% of carbonate-C appears to be derived from atmospheric in-gassing of CO2. The site is discussed as a large scale analogue for potential remedial approaches and carbon sequestration technologies that could be applied to red mud slurries and other hyperalkaline wastes. The results of this work have substantial implications for the aluminium production industry in which 3–4% of the direct CO2 emissions may be offset by carbonate precipitation. Furthermore, carbonation by gypsum addition may be important for contaminant remediation, also providing a physical stabilisation strategy for the numerous historic stockpiles of red mud.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Earth and Ocean Sciences
Uncontrolled Keywords: Bauxite processing residue; Red mud; Carbon dioxide removal; Stable isotope; Hyperalkaline wastes; Carbonate precipitation
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0048-9697
Last Modified: 08 May 2019 02:43
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/60893

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