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Long-term hibernation of human fetal striatal tissue does not adversely affect its differentiation in vitro or graft survival:implications for clinical trials in huntington's disease

Hurelbrink, C. B., Tyers, P., Armstrong, R. J., Dunnett, Stephen Bruce, Barker, R. A. and Rosser, Anne Elizabeth 2003. Long-term hibernation of human fetal striatal tissue does not adversely affect its differentiation in vitro or graft survival:implications for clinical trials in huntington's disease. Cell Transplantation 12 (7) , pp. 687-695. 10.3727/000000003108747307

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Abstract

Transplantation of human fetal CNS tissue is a promising therapy for neurodegenerative conditions such as Huntington's disease (HD), but its widespread adoption is limited by restricted tissue availability. One method of overcoming this problem would be to store the tissue in hibernation medium, an approach that we reported previously for human fetal striatal tissue stored for up to 24 h. We now demonstrate the feasibility of storing such tissue for up to 8 days in hibernation medium. When either fresh or 8-day hibernated striatal cells were cultured under standard conditions for 4 days, the proportion of DARPP-32-positive neurons did not differ significantly, although the total number of cells was significantly less from tissue that had been hibernated. Six weeks after transplantation into cyclosporin A-immunosuppressed unilateral quinolinic acid-lesioned rats, there was no significant difference between fresh and hibernated grafts, both in terms of graft volume and extent of striatal phenotypic markers. This study therefore clearly demonstrates that hibernation of human fetal striatal tissue for up to 8 days is not deleterious to its differentiation in culture or survival following transplantation, and is therefore an appropriate method of storage for this tissue.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Graft survival; Neural transplantation; Tissue storage; Xenograft.
Publisher: Cognizant Communication Corporation
ISSN: 0963-6897
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2019 20:59
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/63497

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