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Illness beliefs predict self-care behaviours in patients with diabetic foot ulcers: A prospective study

Vedhara, Kavita, Dawe, Karen, Wetherell, Mark A., Miles, Jeremy N.V., Cullum, Nicky, Dayan, Colin Mark, Drake, Nicola, Price, Patricia Elaine, Tarlton, John, Weinman, John, Day, Andrew and Campbell, Rona 2014. Illness beliefs predict self-care behaviours in patients with diabetic foot ulcers: A prospective study. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 106 (1) , pp. 67-72. 10.1016/j.diabres.2014.07.018

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Abstract

Aims: Patients’ illness beliefs are known to be influential determinants of self-care behaviours in many chronic conditions. In a prospective observational study we examined their role in predicting foot self-care behaviours in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: Patients (n = 169) were recruited from outpatient podiatry clinics. Clinical and demographic factors, illness beliefs and foot self-care behaviours were assessed as baseline (week 0). Foot self-care behaviours were assessed again 6, 12 and 24 weeks later. Linear regressions examined the contribution of beliefs at baseline to subsequent foot self-care behaviours, controlling for past behaviour (i.e., foot self-care at baseline) and clinical and demographic factors that may affect foot self-care (i.e., age and ulcer size). Results: Our models accounted for between 42 and 58% of the variance in foot self-care behaviours. Even after controlling for past foot-care behaviours, age and ulcer size; patients’ beliefs regarding the symptoms associated with ulceration, their understanding of ulceration and their perceived personal control over ulceration emerged as independent determinants of foot self-care. Conclusions: Patients’ beliefs are important determinants of foot-care practices. They may, therefore, also be influential in determining ulcer outcomes. Interventions aimed at modifying illness beliefs may offer a means for promoting self-care and improving ulcer outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Healthcare Sciences
Systems Immunity Research Institute (SIURI)
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0168-8227
Last Modified: 05 Mar 2019 12:33
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/63816

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