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The effect of self-efficacy on visual discrimination sensitivity

Zacharopoulos, George, Binetti, Nicola, Walsh, Vincent and Kanai, Ryota 2014. The effect of self-efficacy on visual discrimination sensitivity. PLoS ONE 9 (10) , e109392. 10.1371/journal.pone.0109392

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Abstract

Can subjective belief about one's own perceptual competence change one's perception? To address this question, we investigated the influence of self-efficacy on sensory discrimination in two low-level visual tasks: contrast and orientation discrimination. We utilised a pre-post manipulation approach whereby two experimental groups (high and low self-efficacy) and a control group made objective perceptual judgments on the contrast or the orientation of the visual stimuli. High and low self-efficacy were induced by the provision of fake social-comparative performance feedback and fictional research findings. Subsequently, the post-manipulation phase was performed to assess changes in visual discrimination thresholds as a function of the self-efficacy manipulations. The results showed that the high self-efficacy group demonstrated greater improvement in visual discrimination sensitivity compared to both the low self-efficacy and control groups. These findings suggest that subjective beliefs about one's own perceptual competence can affect low-level visual processing.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Publisher: Public Library of Science
ISSN: 1932-6203
Funders: PRESTO grant from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2017 16:00
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/65761

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