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The lateral neostriatum is necessary for compensatory ingestive behaviour after intravascular dehydration in female rats

Lelos, Mariah Jillian, Harrison, David John, Rosser, Anne Elizabeth and Dunnett, Stephen Bruce 2013. The lateral neostriatum is necessary for compensatory ingestive behaviour after intravascular dehydration in female rats. Appetite 71 , pp. 287-294. 10.1016/j.appet.2013.09.003

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Abstract

Aberrant striatal function results in an array of physiological symptoms, including impaired consummatory and regulatory behaviours, which can lead to weight loss and dehydration. It was hypothesised, therefore, that cell loss in the neostriatum may contribute to altered fluid intake by regulating physiological signals related to dehydration status. To test this theory, rats with lesions of the lateral neostriatum and sham controls underwent a series of physiological challenges, including the experimental induction of intracellular and intravascular dehydration. No baseline differences in prandial or non-prandial drinking were observed, nor were differences in locomotor activity evident between groups. Furthermore, intracellular dehydration increased water intake in lesion rats in a manner comparable to sham rats. Interestingly, a specific impairment was evident in lesion rats after subcutaneous injection of poly-ethylene glycol was used to induce intravascular dehydration, such that lesion rats failed to adapt their water intake to this physiological change. The results suggest that the striatal lesions resulted in regulatory dysfunction by impairing motivational control over compensatory ingestive behaviour after intravascular hydration, while the physiological signals related to dehydration remain intact. Loss of these cells in neurodegenerative disorders, such Huntington’s disease, may contribute to regulatory changes evident in the course of the disease.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0195-6663
Last Modified: 18 Mar 2019 21:32
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/66395

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