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Delivery of sonic hedgehog or glial derived neurotrophic factor to dopamine-rich grafts in a rat model of Parkinson's disease using adenoviral vectors

Torres, Eduardo Miguel, Monville, C., Lowenstein, P. R., Castro, M. G. and Dunnett, Stephen Bruce 2005. Delivery of sonic hedgehog or glial derived neurotrophic factor to dopamine-rich grafts in a rat model of Parkinson's disease using adenoviral vectors. Brain Research Bulletin 68 (1-2) , pp. 31-41. 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2005.08.021

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Abstract

The poor survival of dopamine grafts in Parkinson's disease is one of the main obstacles to the widespread application of this therapy. One hypothesis is that implanted neurons, once removed from the embryonic environment, lack the differentiation factors needed to develop the dopaminergic phenotype. In an effort to improve the numbers of dopamine neurons surviving in the grafts, we have investigated the potential of adenoviral vectors to deliver the differentiation factor sonic hedgehog or the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF to dopamine-rich grafts in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Adenoviral vectors containing sonic hedgehog, GDNF, or the marker gene LacZ were injected into the dopamine depleted striatum of hemiparkinsonian rats. Two weeks later, ventral mesencephalic cell suspensions were prepared from embryos of donor ages E12, E13, E14 or E15 and implanted into the vector-transduced striatum. Pre-treatment with the sonic hedgehog vector produced a three-fold increase in the numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (presumed dopaminergic) cells in grafts derived from E12 donors, but had no effect on E13–E15 grafts. By contrast, pre-treatment with the GDNF vector increased yields of dopamine cells in grafts derived from E14 and E15 donors but had no effect on grafts from younger donors. The results indicate that provision of both trophic and differentiation factors can enhance the yields of dopamine neurons in ventral mesencephalic grafts, but that the two factors differ in the age and stage of embryonic development at which they have maximal effects.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0361-9230
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 07:29
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/66770

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