Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

The postsubiculum and spatial learning: The role of postsubicular synaptic activity and synaptic plasticity in Hippocampal place cell, object, and object-location memory

Bett, D., Stevenson, C. H., Shires, Katherine L., Smith, M. T., Martin, S. J., Dudchenko, P. A. and Wood, E. R. 2013. The postsubiculum and spatial learning: The role of postsubicular synaptic activity and synaptic plasticity in Hippocampal place cell, object, and object-location memory. Journal of Neuroscience 33 (16) , pp. 6928-6943. 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5476-12.2013

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Visual landmarks exert stimulus control over spatial behavior and the spatially tuned firing of place, head-direction, and grid cells in the rodent. However, the neural site of convergence for representations of landmarks and representations of space has yet to be identified. A potential site of plasticity underlying associations with landmarks is the postsubiculum. To test this, we blocked glutamatergic transmission in the rat postsubiculum with CNQX, or NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity with d-AP5. These infusions were sufficient to block evoked potentials from the lateral dorsal thalamus and long-term depression following tetanization of this input to the postsubiculum, respectively. In a second experiment, CNQX disrupted the stability of rat hippocampal place cell fields in a familiar environment. In a novel environment, blockade of plasticity with d-AP5 in the postsubiculum did not block the formation of a stable place field map following a 6 h delay. In a final behavioral experiment, postsubicular infusions of both compounds blocked object-location memory in the rat, but did not affect object recognition memory. These results suggest that the postsubiculum is necessary for the recognition of familiar environments, and that NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity in the postsubiculum is required for the formation of new object–place associations that support recognition memory. However, plasticity in the postsubiculum is not necessary for the formation of new spatial maps.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
Publisher: Society for Neuroscience
ISSN: 0270-6474
Last Modified: 05 Sep 2020 01:33
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/67838

Citation Data

Cited 4 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 10 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item