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Work intensification in Britain: first findings from the Skills and Employment Survey 2012

Felstead, Alan, Gallie, Duncan, Green, Francis and Inanc, Hande 2013. Work intensification in Britain: first findings from the Skills and Employment Survey 2012. [Project Report]. London: Centre for Learning and Life Chances in Knowledge Economies and Societies, Institute of Education. Available at: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/socsi/ses2012/[hidden]res...

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Abstract

Working hard can be challenging, stressful and costly, but it can also be stimulating, rewarding and financially beneficial. Work intensification was a feature of the early 1990s, after which work effort levelled off. This report tracks what has been happening in recent years.  Work intensification has resumed in Britain since 2006. Both the speed of work has quickened and the pressures of working to tight deadlines have also risen to record highs.  Work has intensified more sharply for women, and especially for women working full-time who have experienced some of the largest rises in work intensity since 2006.  Work intensification is associated with technological change, which is therefore effort-biased. Although the resumption of work intensification may also be due to the recession, contrary to some predictions high work intensity is not associated on average with downsizing.

Item Type: Monograph (Project Report)
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Publisher: Centre for Learning and Life Chances in Knowledge Economies and Societies, Institute of Education
Related URLs:
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 07:47
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/67987

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