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Deconstruction of different forms of apartheid in the works of Edward Said, J. M. Coetzee and Jabra Ibrahim Jabra: A comparative study of violence, resistance and alienation

Zakarriya Mahmoud, Jihan 2014. Deconstruction of different forms of apartheid in the works of Edward Said, J. M. Coetzee and Jabra Ibrahim Jabra: A comparative study of violence, resistance and alienation. PhD Thesis, Cardiff University.

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Abstract

In this thesis, I trace the representation of different forms of female cultural, economic and political activism in a selection of novels by the South African novelist, J. M.Coetzee, and the Palestinian novelist, Jabra Ibrahim Jabra. Using Edward Said’s contrapuntal theory as a critical method, the thesis investigates the interaction between politics and literature, focusing particularly on the representation of women, in South Africa and Palestine, which are both viewed as territories under apartheid. It analyses the differences and the similarities in the ways the notions of female nationalism and identity are represented in the selected novels, identifying a shared humanist perspective on female resistance, expressed by all three authors. Such a humanist-oriented, contrapuntal perspective is sustained by a secular understanding and a hybrid interpretation of different socio-cultural groups, which question established norms and traditions, expanding the boundaries of established cultural identity to emphasize acceptance of diversity, nonviolence, and co-existence. The three authors demonstrate that political polarization perpetuates antagonism and violence, while political-cultural dialogue helps to shift the focus onto possible paths of mutual understanding and cooperation. In this way, female resistance in the chosen novels symbolizes a humanist effort not only to redefine exclusive and hierarchical cultural notions of nationalism, authenticity and identity, but also to build inclusive socio-cultural orders free of gender bias.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Status: Unpublished
Schools: English, Communication and Philosophy
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General)
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2016 02:30
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/68020

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