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Consistency of maternal cognitions and principles across the first five months following preterm and term deliveries

Winstanley, A., Sperotto, R. G., Putnick, D. L., Cherian, S., Bornstein, M. H. and Gattis, M. 2014. Consistency of maternal cognitions and principles across the first five months following preterm and term deliveries. Infant Behavior and Development 37 (4) , pp. 760-771. 10.1016/j.infbeh.2014.09.005

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Abstract

The aims of this study were to examine and compare the development of parenting cognitions and principles in mothers following preterm and term deliveries. Parenting cognitions about child development, including thinking that is restricted to single causes and single outcomes (categorical thinking) and thinking that takes into account multiple perspectives (perspectivist thinking), have been shown to relate to child outcomes. Parenting principles about using routines (structure) or infant cues (attunement) to guide daily caregiving have been shown to relate to caregiving practices. We investigated the continuity and stability of parenting cognitions and principles in the days following birth to 5 months postpartum for mothers of infants born term and preterm. All parenting cognitions were stable across time. Categorical thinking increased at a group level across time in mothers of preterm, but not term, infants. Perspectivist thinking increased at a group level for first-time mothers (regardless of birth status) and tended to be lower in mothers of preterm infants. Structure at birth did not predict later structure (and so was unstable) in mothers of preterm, but not term, infants and neither group changed in mean level across time. Attunement was consistent across time in both groups of mothers. These results indicate that prematurity has multiple, diverse effects on parenting beliefs, which may in turn influence maternal behavior and child outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0163-6383
Funders: Wellcome Trust
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Date of Acceptance: 29 September 2014
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2020 17:32
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/68081

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