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The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study

Sumner, Petroc, Vivian-Griffiths, Solveiga, Boivin, Jacky, Williams, Andy, Venetis, C. A., Davies, Aimee, Ogden, Jack, Whelan, Leanne, Hughes, Bethan, Dalton, Bethan, Boy, Frederic and Chambers, Christopher D. 2014. The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study. BMJ 349 , g7015. 10.1136/bmj.g7015

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Abstract

Objective To identify the source (press releases or news) of distortions, exaggerations, or changes to the main conclusions drawn from research that could potentially influence a reader’s health related behaviour. Design Retrospective quantitative content analysis. Setting Journal articles, press releases, and related news, with accompanying simulations. Sample Press releases (n=462) on biomedical and health related science issued by 20 leading UK universities in 2011, alongside their associated peer reviewed research papers and news stories (n=668). Main outcome measures Advice to readers to change behaviour, causal statements drawn from correlational research, and inference to humans from animal research that went beyond those in the associated peer reviewed papers. Results 40% (95% confidence interval 33% to 46%) of the press releases contained exaggerated advice, 33% (26% to 40%) contained exaggerated causal claims, and 36% (28% to 46%) contained exaggerated inference to humans from animal research. When press releases contained such exaggeration, 58% (95% confidence interval 48% to 68%), 81% (70% to 93%), and 86% (77% to 95%) of news stories, respectively, contained similar exaggeration, compared with exaggeration rates of 17% (10% to 24%), 18% (9% to 27%), and 10% (0% to 19%) in news when the press releases were not exaggerated. Odds ratios for each category of analysis were 6.5 (95% confidence interval 3.5 to 12), 20 (7.6 to 51), and 56 (15 to 211). At the same time, there was little evidence that exaggeration in press releases increased the uptake of news. Conclusions Exaggeration in news is strongly associated with exaggeration in press releases. Improving the accuracy of academic press releases could represent a key opportunity for reducing misleading health related news.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies
Medicine
Psychology
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN: 1756-1833
Funders: BBSRC, Wellcome Trust
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2017 11:17
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/68310

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