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Clinical challenges of classification based targeted therapies for non-specific low back pain: What do physiotherapy practitioners and managers think?

Sheeran, Liba, Coales, Philippa J. and Sparkes, Valerie 2015. Clinical challenges of classification based targeted therapies for non-specific low back pain: What do physiotherapy practitioners and managers think? Manual Therapy 20 (3) , pp. 456-462. 10.1016/j.math.2014.11.008

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Abstract

Background Classification of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) was recommended to better target care and so maximise treatment potential. This study investigated physiotherapy practitioners' (PPs) and managers' (PMs) views, experiences and perceptions of barriers and enablers for using classification systems (CSs) to better target treatment for NSLBP in the NHS primary care setting. Design Qualitative focus group and interviews. Methods Data from semi-structured interviews of three PMs and a focus group with five PPs, considered local opinion leaders in physiotherapy, was thematically analysed. Results Five themes emerged (i) CS knowledge: PPs and PMs were aware of CSs and agreed with its usefulness. PPs were mostly aware of CSs informing specific treatments whilst PMs were aware of prognosis based CSs. (ii) Using CSs: PPs classify by experience and clinical reasoning skills, shifting between multiple CSs. PMs were confident that evidence-based practice takes place but believed CSs may not be always used. (iii) Advantages/disadvantages of CSs: Effective targeting of treatments to patients was perceived as advantageous; but the amount of training required was perceived as disadvantageous. (iv) Barriers: Patients' expectations, clinicians' perceptions, insufficiently complex CSs, lack of training resources. (v) Enablers: Development of sufficiently complex CSs, placed within the clinical reasoning process, mentoring, positive engagement with stakeholders and patients. Conclusions PPs and PMs were aware of CSs and agreed with its usefulness. The current classification process was perceived to be largely influenced by individual practitioner knowledge and clinical reasoning skills rather than being based on one CS alone. Barriers and enablers were identified for future research.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Healthcare Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RZ Other systems of medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords: Classification; Non-specific low back pain; Subgroups; Health practitioner opinions
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1356-689X
Funders: Arthritis Research UK
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Date of Acceptance: 17 November 2014
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2019 13:53
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/69663

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