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Young British partisans' and non-voters' processing of attack election advertising and the implications for marketing politics

Dermody, Janine, Hanmer-Lloyd, Stuart, Koenig-Lewis, Nicole and Zhao, Anita Lifen 2014. Young British partisans' and non-voters' processing of attack election advertising and the implications for marketing politics. Journal of Marketing Management 30 (9-10) , pp. 974-1005. 10.1080/0267257X.2014.933866

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Abstract

This article presents an empirical study of young partisans’ and non-voters’ processing of attack ad messages utilised in the 2010 British general election. Expanding understanding of how these messages are processed is important because they can aid electoral and civic engagement, which is declining amongst youth. Currently, there is limited understanding of how youth process these ad messages and how they influence their engagement. We applied motivated reasoning to explore this in a national survey in England with 18- to 22-year-old British first-time voters, with data from 646 respondents presented in this article. Overall, our young partisans and non-voters employed motivated reasoning – (de)selection and critical appraisal – in their ad processing, thereby advancing understanding of how youth process attack election advertising. Concerns surrounding the use of attack election advertising emerge, suggesting the need for greater appraisal of the relevance of marketing in the development of election campaign strategies.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Published Online
Status: Published
Schools: Business (Including Economics)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce
J Political Science > JC Political theory
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 0267-257x
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 22 November 2017
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2019 16:54
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/70874

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