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The Psychology of Stroke in Young Adults: The Roles of Service Provision and Return to Work

Morris, Reg 2011. The Psychology of Stroke in Young Adults: The Roles of Service Provision and Return to Work. Stroke Research and Treatment 2011 , pp. 1-10. 10.4061/2011/534812

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Abstract

Literature about the psychological consequences of stroke in those under 65 is reviewed focussing on services and work. Despite similarities, young and old survivors have different experiences and needs. These are attributable to the effects of stroke on age-normative roles and activities, self-image, and the young person’s stage in the life-cycle, especially family and work. “Hidden” cognitive impairments, a disrupted sense of self, and the incongruity of suffering an “older person’s” disease are salient. Young survivors benefit from services, but experience lack of congruence between their needs and service philosophy,methods, and aims, and consequently have unmet needs. Employment is psychologically salient, and the evidence about return rates, factors that affect return, and the adequacy of employment-related service provision is reviewed. Specific and general recommendations are made for increasing congruence between young survivors’ needs and service provision and also for facilitating their return to work.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords: Stroke patients ; Clinical rehabilitation ; Young people.
Publisher: SAGE-Hindawi
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 01:59
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/7246

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