Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Patterns of shell repair in articulate brachiopods indicate size constitutes a refuge from predation

Harper, Elizabeth M., Peck, Lloyd S. and Hendry, Katharine Rosemary 2009. Patterns of shell repair in articulate brachiopods indicate size constitutes a refuge from predation. Marine Biology 156 (10) , pp. 1993-2000. 10.1007/s00227-009-1230-1

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The cost of overcoming prey defenses relative to the value of internal tissues is a key criterion in predator/prey interactions. Optimal foraging theory predicts: (1) specific sizes of prey will result in the best returns to predators, and (2) there will often be a size at which the cost/benefit balance is low enough to effectively exclude predation. Data presented here on styles of repaired shell damage and size at which injury had been sustained was collected from samples of terebratulide brachiopods from the Antarctic Peninisula (Liothyrella uva), Falkland Islands (Magellania venosa and Terebratella dorsata) and Chile (M. venosa). The predominant form of damage on shells was indicative of predators attacking the valve margins. The modal size for repaired damage was more than 10 mm smaller than the modal size for the overall size distribution in each species and there were no repaired attacks in the largest size classes of any species. These data suggest that size forms a refuge from predation, as would be predicted by optimal foraging theory. The optimal sizes that predators appeared to attack vary between species, as do the sizes that provided a refuge from predation. High levels of multiple repairs (19% of the M. venosa population from the Falkland Islands sampled had 2 or more repairs) suggest that the mortality following attack is low, suggesting that many predators abandon their attacks.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Earth and Ocean Sciences
Publisher: SpringerLink
ISSN: 0025-3162
Last Modified: 23 Mar 2017 02:44
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/7523

Citation Data

Cited 18 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 38 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item