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Prospective and mutual influences of reward processing and emotional disorders in a longitudinal study of the adolescent offspring of depressed parents: the EPAD Cohort

Rice, Frances 2014. Prospective and mutual influences of reward processing and emotional disorders in a longitudinal study of the adolescent offspring of depressed parents: the EPAD Cohort. Biological Psychiatry 75 (9) , 195S. 10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.03.015

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Abstract

Background: Alterations in reward processing have been reported in adolescent depressive and anxiety disorders. Evidence from the present cohort suggests that altered reward processing may represent an early vulnerability factor for the development of depressive disorder. However, symptoms of emotional disorders and reward processing may mutually influence each other over time and the extent to which severity of parental depression is associated with altered reward processing in high-risk offspring is unknown. Methods: A two-wave panel design of adolescent offspring of unipolar depressed parents where complete data on reward processing and psychopathology were available on two occasions spaced one year apart (N=197). We examined longitudinal relationships between symptoms of adolescent depression and anxiety (generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety) with reward processing. We also examined associations between adolescent reward processing and severe parental unipolar depression (an episode requiring hospitalization or GAF score <=30) Results: Adolescent depressive symptoms were associated with decreases in risk-adjustment over time (β=-.15, p=.03) while social anxiety symptoms were associated with increases in risk-adjustment over time (β=.22, p<.01). Followup analyses suggested that depression was associated with reductions in rewardseeking at highly favorable reward contingencies only, whereas social anxiety led to reductions in reward-seeking in low probability contingencies only. Parent depression severity was associated with lower adolescent reward seeking at highly favorable reward contingencies (r= -.162, p=.03). Conclusions: Social anxiety and depression are associated with distinct alterations in reward processing. High-risk offspring whose parents have experienced severe depressive episodes may be particularly vulnerable to impairments in reward processing.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Additional Information: Abstract
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0006-3223
Last Modified: 30 May 2019 13:18
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/80122

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