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The morphological development of neurons derived from EGF- and FGF-2-driven human CNS precursors depends on their site of integration in the neonatal rat brain

Rosser, Anne Elizabeth, Tyers, P. and Dunnett, S. B. 2000. The morphological development of neurons derived from EGF- and FGF-2-driven human CNS precursors depends on their site of integration in the neonatal rat brain. European Journal of Neuroscience 12 (7) , pp. 2405-2413. 10.1046/j.1460-9568.2000.00135.x

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Abstract

Neural precursor cells derived from the developing human brain were expanded in vitro under the influence of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and epidermal growth hormone (EGF), and were then transplanted into different regions of the neonatal rat brain. Four weeks later neurons were seen to have developed from human embryonic precursors, using a human-specific antibody to tau (htau). There were morphological differences between implanted neurons developing in the hippocampus, striatum and neocortex, which were confirmed by cell volume measurements, although no specific neurochemical phenotypes were identified. Htau-positive fibres were seen to project extensively along fibre pathways appropriate for the site of neuronal integration. This study demonstrates that, following cell division in vitro, neurons differentiating from human precursor cell populations retain the ability to respond appropriately to regional determinants present in the neonatal rat brain. This is important for the application of such cells in CNS repair strategies, in particular neural transplantation.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Publisher: Oxford, UK : Published on behalf of the European Neuroscience Association by Oxford University Press, c1989-
ISSN: 0953-816X
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 08:36
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/81095

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