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Neutralizing antibodies explain the poor clinical response to Interferon beta in a small proportion of patients with Multiple Sclerosis: a retrospective study

Sbardella, Emilia, Tomassini, Valentina, Gasperini, Claudio, Bellomi, Francesca, Cefaro, Luca, Morra, Vincenzo, Antonelli, Guido and Pozzilli, Carlo 2009. Neutralizing antibodies explain the poor clinical response to Interferon beta in a small proportion of patients with Multiple Sclerosis: a retrospective study. BMC Neurology 9 (1) , p. 54. 10.1186/1471-2377-9-54

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against Interferon beta (IFNbeta) are reported to be associated with poor clinical response to therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. We aimed to quantify the contribution of NAbs to the sub-optimal response of IFNbeta treatment. METHODS: We studied the prevalence of NAbs in MS patients grouped according to their clinical response to IFNbeta during the treatment period. Patients were classified as: group A, developing >or= 1 relapse after the first 6 months of therapy; group B, exhibiting confirmed disability progression after the first 6 months of therapy, with or without superimposed relapses; group C, presenting a stable disease course during therapy. A cytopathic effect assay tested the presence of NAbs in a cohort of ambulatory MS patients treated with one of the available IFNbeta formulations for at least one year. NAbs positivity was defined as NAbs titre >or= 20 TRU. RESULTS: Seventeen patients (12.1%) were NAbs positive. NAbs positivity correlated with poorer clinical response (p < 0.04). As expected, the prevalence of NAbs was significantly lower in Group C (2.1%) than in Group A (17.0%) and Group B (17.0%). However, in the groups of patients with a poor clinical response (A, B), NAbs positivity was found only in a small proportion of patients.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Publisher: BioMed Central
ISSN: 1471-2377
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2020 01:36
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/81453

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