Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

The genetics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Thapar, Anita, O'Donovan, Michael Conlon and Owen, Michael John 2005. The genetics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Human Molecular Genetics 14 (2) , pp. 275-282. 10.1093/hmg/ddi263

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable, disruptive, childhood-onset condition, the aetiology and pathogenesis of which is poorly understood. There have been relatively few genome-wide linkage studies, and no chromosomal region has yet been unequivocally implicated. In contrast, evidence from pharmacological, neuroimaging and animal studies has suggested the involvement of specific neurotransmitter systems, notably dopaminergic pathways, in ADHD and these aetiological clues have inspired a fruitful application of the candidate gene association approach. Meta-analyses or pooled data analyses have supported association between ADHD and polymorphisms in DRD4, DRD5 and SLC6A3 which encode dopamine D4 and D5 receptors and the dopamine transporter, respectively. A weaker, but nevertheless replicated, body of evidence also supports associations with SNAP-25 (synaptosomal-associated protein, 25 kDa) and SLC6A4 (serotonin transporter). There is increasing research interest in gene-phenotype links, clinical phenotypic markers of heterogeneity and gene--environment interaction, which are likely to be important in the next generation of genetic studies.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Medicine
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISSN: 0964-6906
Last Modified: 25 Dec 2017 20:50
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/83364

Citation Data

Cited 223 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 163 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item