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Concurrent nucleotide substitution mutations in the human genome are characterized by a significantly decreased transition/transversion ratio

Zhu, Wenjuan, Cooper, David Neil, Zhao, Qian, Wang, Ye, Liu, Ruihong, Li, Qibin, Férec, Claude, Wang, Yiming and Chen, Jian-Min 2015. Concurrent nucleotide substitution mutations in the human genome are characterized by a significantly decreased transition/transversion ratio. Human Mutation 36 (3) , pp. 333-341. 10.1002/humu.22749

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Abstract

There is accumulating evidence that the number of multiple-nucleotide substitutions (MNS) occurring in closely spaced sites in eukaryotic genomes is significantly higher than would be predicted from the random accumulation of independently generated single-nucleotide substitutions (SNS). Although this excess can in principle be accounted for by the concept of transient hypermutability, a general mutational signature of concurrent MNS mutations has not so far been evident. Employing a dataset (N = 449) of “concurrent” double MNS mutations causing human inherited disease, we have identified just such a mutational signature: concurrently generated double MNS mutations exhibit a >twofold lower transition/transversion ratio (termed RTs/Tv) than independently generated de novo SNS mutations (<0.80 vs. 2.10; P = 2.69 × 10−14). We replicated this novel finding through a similar analysis employing two double MNS variant datasets with differing abundances of concurrent events (150,521 variants with both substitutions on the same haplotypic lineage vs. 94,875 variants whose component substitutions were on different haplotypic lineages) plus 5,430,874 SNS variants, all being derived from the whole-genome sequencing of seven Chinese individuals. Evaluation of the newly observed mutational signature in diverse contexts provides solid support for the postulated role of translesion synthesis DNA polymerases in transient hypermutability.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0254 Neoplasms. Tumors. Oncology (including Cancer)
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN: 1059-7794
Date of Acceptance: 17 December 2014
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2019 12:58
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/84060

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