Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Variability in emotional/behavioral problems in boys with oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder: the role of arousal

Schoorl, Jantiene, Van Rijn, Sophie, De Wied, Minet, Van Goozen, Stephanie Helena Maria and Swaab, Hanna 2016. Variability in emotional/behavioral problems in boys with oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder: the role of arousal. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 25 (8) , pp. 821-830. 10.1007/s00787-015-0790-5

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (317kB) | Preview

Abstract

It is often reported that children with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or conduct disorder (CD) are under-aroused. However, the evidence is mixed, with some children with ODD/CD displaying high arousal. This has led to the hypothesis that different profiles of arousal dysfunction may exist within children with ODD/CD. This knowledge could explain variability within children with ODD/CD, both in terms of specific types of aggression as well as comorbid symptoms (e.g., other emotional/behavioral problems). We measured heart rate variability (HRV), heart rate (HR) and skin conductance level (SCL) during rest and stress, and obtained parent and teacher reports of aggression, anxiety, attention problems and autism traits in a sample of 66 ODD/CD and 36 non-clinical boys (aged 8–12 years). The ODD/CD group scored significantly higher on aggression, anxiety, attention problems and autism traits than the controls; boys with ODD/CD also had higher resting HRs than controls, but HR stress, HRV and SCL did not differ. Hierarchical regressions showed different physiological profiles in subgroups of boys with ODD/CD based on their type of aggression; a pattern of high baseline HR and SCL, but low stress HRV was related to reactive aggression, whereas the opposite physiological pattern (low HR, low stress SCL, high stress HRV) was related to proactive aggression. Furthermore, high stress SCL was related to anxiety symptoms, whereas low stress SCL was related to attention problems. These findings are important because they indicate heterogeneity within boys with ODD/CD and highlight the importance of using physiology to differentiate boys with different ODD/CD subtypes.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Publisher: Springer
ISSN: 1018-8827
Funders: Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Date of Acceptance: 26 October 2015
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 08:46
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/84674

Citation Data

Cited 13 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics