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The effect of birth weight on lung spirometry in white, school-aged children and adolescents born at term: a longitudinal population based observational cohort study

Kotecha, Sarah Joanne, Watkins, William John, Henderson, A. John and Kotecha, Sailesh 2015. The effect of birth weight on lung spirometry in white, school-aged children and adolescents born at term: a longitudinal population based observational cohort study. The Journal of Pediatrics 166 (5) , pp. 1163-1167. 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.01.002

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Abstract

Objective To evaluate how birth weight affects lung function measurements in childhood and adolescence in term-born children. Study design We used data for white, term-born, singletons, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to determine the association between birth weight and lung function at age 8-9 (n = 4086) and 14-17 (n = 2582) years. z-scores for lung function measures, adjusted for sex, height, and age, were modeled in terms of birth weight z-score adjusted for sex. In addition, gestation and head circumference then confounders (maternal smoking during pregnancy and social class) were added to the model. Results At age 8-9 years, birth weight z-scores were significantly associated with lung function z-scores (forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity [FVC], and forced mid-expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC). These relationships essentially were unchanged when birth weight z-scores were further adjusted for gestation, head circumference, and confounders, except for forced mid-expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC, which was no longer significant after we adjusted for head circumference and confounders. At age 14-17 years, the associations between adjusted birth-weight z-scores and spirometry z-scores were in general not significant. Estimated differences for forced expiratory volume in 1 second were 30 mL at ages 8-9 years and 33 mL at 14-17 years for 1 kg change in birth-weight standardized for gestation and sex. Conclusions Birth weight is associated with lung function in term-born children at 8-9 years, but less so at 14-17 years, suggesting that birth weight influences lung function in early childhood but has lesser effect later in life.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
Uncontrolled Keywords: ALSPAC, Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, FEF25-75, Forced mid-expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC, FEV1, Forced expiratory volume in 1 second, FVC, Forced vital capacity, IUGR, Intrauterine growth restriction
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0022-3476
Date of Acceptance: 5 January 2015
Last Modified: 13 Jun 2019 10:53
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/86305

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