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Cross-national comparative mixed-methods case study of recovery-focused mental health care planning and co-ordination: Collaborative Care Planning Project (COCAPP)

Simpson, A., Hannigan, Ben, Coffey, M., Jones, Aled, Barlow, Sally, Cohen, R., Všetečková, J. and Faulkner, A. 2016. Cross-national comparative mixed-methods case study of recovery-focused mental health care planning and co-ordination: Collaborative Care Planning Project (COCAPP). Health Services and Delivery Research 4 (5) 10.3310/hsdr04050

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Abstract

The care programme approach in England and care and treatment planning in Wales are systems designed to provide mental health service users with a named care co-ordinator who meets regularly with the service user, oversees their care and develops a written plan to guide the care that they receive. These approaches are meant to help people towards recovery. In this study, we investigated whether care is organised to help people’s recovery and whether this is done in a personalised way. We identified six NHS trust/health board sites in England and Wales, and surveyed staff and service users to measure views on recovery, empowerment and therapeutic relationships. At each site we also interviewed managers, clinical staff care co-ordinators, service users and carers about their experiences of care planning. We found that good relationships are important for service users, carers and care co-ordinators in care planning and supporting recovery. Experiences of care planning and co-ordination varied within all sites. People do not always feel involved in their own care. The understanding of recovery and personalisation varied among the service users and staff interviewed. Workers say that there is too much paperwork and, like service users, they rarely look at care plans once written. Staff focus on risk but this does not often appear to be discussed with people using services, which may be problematic. We recommend research to investigate new ways of working and training to increase staff contact time with service users and carers and to improve a focus on recovery.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Healthcare Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Additional Information: All journals in the NIHR Journals Library are open access and, with no time limitation, can be freely accessed, downloaded, printed or copied provided the authors and the provenance of the publication are acknowledged at all times.
Publisher: National Institute for Health Research
Funders: National Institute for Health Research Health Services and Delivery Research Programme
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2019 21:51
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/86687

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