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What would John Stuart Mill say? A Utilitarian perspective on contemporary neuroscience debates in leadership

Lindebaum, Dirk and Raftopoulou, Effi 2017. What would John Stuart Mill say? A Utilitarian perspective on contemporary neuroscience debates in leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 144 (4) , pp. 813-822. 10.1007/s10551-014-2247-z

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Abstract

The domain of organizational neuroscience increasingly influences leadership research and practice in terms of both selection and interventions. The dominant view is that the use of neuroscientific theories and methods offers better and refined predictions of what constitutes good leadership. What has been omitted so far, however, is a deeper engagement with ethical theories. This engagement is imperative as it helps problematize a great deal of the current advocacy around organizational neuroscience. In this article, we draw upon John Stuart Mill’s Theory of Utility as a theoretical framework to this end. Our discussion reveals several negative psychological and physical side-effects, which undermine the prevailing view that neuroscientific methods can be used without risk at work. We discuss the theoretical and practical ramifications of our analysis.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Business (Including Economics)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BJ Ethics
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Uncontrolled Keywords: Ethics; Leadership; John Stuart Mill; Organizational neuroscience; Utilitarianism
Publisher: Springer Netherlands
ISSN: 0167-4544
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 1 April 2016
Date of Acceptance: 4 May 2014
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2017 15:04
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/88507

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