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Does frequent residential mobility in early years affect the uptake and timeliness of routine immunisations? An anonymised cohort study

Hutchings, H. A., Evans, Annette, Barnes, P., Healy, M. A., James-Ellison, M., Lyons, R. A., Maddocks, A., Paranjothy, Shantini, Rodgers, S. E. and Dunstan, Frank David John 2016. Does frequent residential mobility in early years affect the uptake and timeliness of routine immunisations? An anonymised cohort study. Vaccine 34 (15) , pp. 1773-1777. 10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.02.049

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Abstract

Background: There are conflicting findings regarding the impact of residential mobility on immunisationstatus. Our aim was to determine whether there was any association between residential mobility andtake up of immunisations and whether they were delayed in administration. Methods: We carried out a cohort analysis of children born in Wales, UK. Uptake and time of immunisationwere collected electronically. We defined frequent movers as those who had moved: 2 or more times inthe period prior to the final scheduled on-time date (4 months) for 5 in 1 vaccinations; and 3 or moretimes in the period prior to the final scheduled on-time date (12 months) for MMR, pneumococcal andmeningitis C vaccinations. We defined immunisations due at 2–4 months delayed if they had not beengiven by age 1; and those due at 12–13 months as delayed if they had not been given by age 2. Results: Uptake rates of routine immunisations and whether they were given within the specified time-frame were high for both groups. There was no increased risk (odds ratios (95% confidence intervals)between frequent movers compared to non-movers for the uptake of: primary MMR 1.08 (0.88–1.32);booster Meningitis C 1.65 (0.93–2.92); booster pneumococcal 1.60 (0.59–4.31); primary 5 in 1 1.28(0.92–1.78); and timeliness: primary MMR 0.92 (0.79–1.07); booster Meningitis C 1.26 (0.77–2.07);booster pneumococcal 1.69 (0.23–12.14); and primary 5 in 1 1.04 (0.88–1.23). Discussion: Findings suggest that children who move home frequently are not adversely affected in termsof the uptake of immunisations and whether they were given within a specified timeframe. Both werehigh and may reflect proactive behaviour in the primary healthcare setting to meet Government coveragerates for immunisation.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Uncontrolled Keywords: Residential mobility; Children; Cohort; Immunisation status
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0264-410X
Funders: Wellcome Trust
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 4 April 2016
Date of Acceptance: 17 February 2016
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2019 22:30
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/88594

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