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Effects of the anthropogenic activities on the morphological evolution of the Modaomen Estuary, Pearl River Delta, China

Jia, Liang-wen, Pan, Shunqi and Wu, Chao-yu 2013. Effects of the anthropogenic activities on the morphological evolution of the Modaomen Estuary, Pearl River Delta, China. China Ocean Engineering 27 (6) , pp. 795-808. 10.1007/s13344-013-0065-1

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Abstract

Owing to the intensive human activities, the Modaomen Estuary has been significantly modified since 1950s, which has resulted in considerable changes of hydrodynamics and morphodynamics in the area. In this paper, the effects of the anthropogenic activities on the hydrodynamics and morphological evolution in the estuary at different stages are systematically assessed based on the detailed bathymetric data and field survey. The results show that the human activities have caused the channelization of the enclosed sea area in the Modamen Estuary; fast seaward movement of the mouth bar with high siltation; expansion of the channel volume due to channel deepening. The paper also highlights the main hydrodynamic changes in the estuary, including the rise of the water level; the distinguishing changes of tidal range before and after the 1990s (decrease and increase respectively); as well as the increase of the divided flow ratio. It is found that reclamation is the main factor promoting the transition of nature of the estuary from runoff dominant to runoff and wave dominant, and sand mining activities are mainly to strengthen the tidal dynamic and to low the water level. The results provide useful guidance for better planning of the future developments in the estuary and further research in the area.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Engineering
Subjects: Q Science > QE Geology
Publisher: Springer Verlag
ISSN: 0890-5487
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2017 09:26
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/89039

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