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The deliverability, acceptability, and perceived effect of the Macmillan approach to eeight loss and eating difficulties: a Phase II, cluster-randomized, exploratory trial of a psychosocial intervention for weight- and eating-related distress in people with advanced cancer

Hopkinson, Jane B., Fenlon, Debbie R., Okamoto, Ikumi, Wright, David N. M., Scott, Issy, Addington-Hall, Julie M. and Foster, Claire 2010. The deliverability, acceptability, and perceived effect of the Macmillan approach to eeight loss and eating difficulties: a Phase II, cluster-randomized, exploratory trial of a psychosocial intervention for weight- and eating-related distress in people with advanced cancer. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 40 (5) , pp. 684-695. 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2010.02.015

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Abstract

Context. Up to 80% of people with cancer will develop weight loss and anorexia during the advanced stages of the disease. The Macmillan Weight and Eating Studies (2000e2009) have used the Medical Research Council complex interventions framework to develop the first psychosocial intervention for weightand eating-related distress (WRD and ERD) in people with advanced cancer and their carers: The Macmillan Approach to Weight and Eating (MAWE). Objectives. This article reports the findings of a Phase II trial of MAWE that investigated its deliverability, acceptability, and patient-perceived effect on WRD and ERD. Methods. The Phase II trial, conducted in 2006e2007, was of clusterrandomized design, with two community palliative care teams randomized to different arms. It used mixed methods to compare an intervention group (n ¼ 25), the MAWE group, which was supported by MAWE-trained clinical nurse specialists, with a group that received usual care (n ¼ 25), the control group. Results. MAWE was deliverable in clinical practice and acceptable to patients. Unplanned exposure of the MAWE group to the intervention before an initial measure of WRD and ERD proved problematic to the trial process. Despite this, quantitative and qualitative analyses indicate that MAWE does not exacerbate WRD and ERD and may help patients with advanced cancer live with the weight loss and anorexia that are the symptoms of cancer cachexia syndrome.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Healthcare Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0254 Neoplasms. Tumors. Oncology (including Cancer)
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Uncontrolled Keywords: Phase II trial ; Mixed methods ; Cancer cachexia ; Weight loss ; Anorexia ; Psychosocial support ; Weight-related distress ; Eating-related distress.
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0885-3924
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 02:07
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/9420

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