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"You help children and they move on... but it changes everything": Stress, coping and enjoyment of fostering among sons and daughters of foster carers

Birch, Emma 2016. "You help children and they move on... but it changes everything": Stress, coping and enjoyment of fostering among sons and daughters of foster carers. DEdPsy Thesis, Cardiff University.
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Abstract

This study aimed to provide a theoretically-based exploration of the experiences of sons and daughters of foster carers, particularly with regard to enjoyment of fostering, stressors and coping mechanisms. Drawing information from a total of 55 participants (aged 7-21) for a mixed methods design, multiple linear regression was used to consider factors which affected fostering enjoyment. Analysis suggested that the age gap between foster children and participants was a significant predictor of enjoyment, as were participants’ use of withdrawal coping strategies and active/emotional regulation coping strategies. Qualitative data were also gained from written questionnaire responses and a focus group (n=8), in which participants were asked for their views on factors which would make fostering easier and harder for them. Thematic analysis of responses suggested four overarching themes which affected experience of fostering. These themes were systemic factors (such as the impact on family systems and rules); within-foster child factors (such as behaviour, age and gender); personal and situational factors (such as house size and length of fostering placement) and relational factors (the impact of fostering on relationships within and outside the family unit). Focus group participants’ descriptions of stressors (events, daily stressors and relational stressors) and coping strategies (escape, withdrawal, social support and ‘moving on’) are also discussed. The findings are then discussed in relation to theories and other research and practical applications are explored.

Item Type: Thesis (DEdPsy)
Date Type: Publication
Status: Unpublished
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 6 October 2016
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2017 05:42
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/95144

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