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Fetal Ureaplasma parvum bacteraemia as a function of gestation-dependent complement insufficiency: evidence from a sheep model of pregnancy

Kemp, Matthew W., Ahmed, Shatha, Beeton, Michael L., Payne, Matthew S., Saito, Masashi, Miura, Yuishira, Usuda, Hiro, Kallapur, Suhas G., Kramer, Boris W., Stock, Sarah J., Jobe, Alan H., Newnham, John and Spiller, Owen B. 2017. Fetal Ureaplasma parvum bacteraemia as a function of gestation-dependent complement insufficiency: evidence from a sheep model of pregnancy. American Journal of Reproductive Immunology 77 (1) , e12599. 10.1111/aji.12599

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Abstract

Problem Complement is a central defence against sepsis, and increasing complement insufficiency in neonates of greater prematurity may predispose to increased sepsis. Ureaplasma spp. are the most frequently cultured bacteria from preterm blood samples. Method of study A sheep model of intrauterine Ureaplasma parvum infection was used to examine in vivo Ureaplasma bacteraemia at early and late gestational ages. Complement function and Ureaplasma killing assays were used to determine the correlation between complement potency and bactericidal activity of sera ex vivo. Results Ureaplasma was cultured from 50% of 95-day gestation lamb cord blood samples compared to 10% of 125-day gestation lambs. Bactericidal activity increased with increased gestational age, and a direct correlation between functional complement activity and bactericidal activity (R2=.86; P<.001) was found for 95-day gestational lambs. Conclusions Ureaplasma bacteraemia in vivo was confined to early preterm lambs with low complement function, but Ureaplasma infection itself did not diminish complement levels.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 1046-7408
Funders: Royal Society
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 24 October 2016
Date of Acceptance: 13 October 2016
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2020 13:07
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/95438

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