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Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder: a potential gateway to the development of disease-modifying treatments in neurodegenerative disorders

Peall, Kathryn J. and Robertson, Neil 2016. Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder: a potential gateway to the development of disease-modifying treatments in neurodegenerative disorders. Journal of Neurology 263 (8) , pp. 1678-1680. 10.1007/s00415-016-8235-8

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Abstract

Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavioural disorder (RBD) is classified as one of the REM parasomnias with clinical characteristics including unpleasant dreams, acting out of dreams, and loss of the typical muscle atonia during the REM phase of sleep. Other associated clinical features include olfactory loss, dysautonomia, colour vision impairment and subtle Parkinsonian signs. RBD has been shown to predict development of an alpha-synucleinopathy in 20–45 % of patients within 5 years, and up to 92 % within 14 years post-diagnosis. Hence, this disorder provides a potential opportunity for understanding the prodromal stages of the synucleinopathies and exploring efficacy of potential neuroprotective agents.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Publisher: Springer
ISSN: 0340-5354
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 10 November 2016
Date of Acceptance: 13 July 2016
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2019 20:57
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/96004

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