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A combined post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histological study of multiple sclerosis pathology

Kolasinski, James, Stagg, C. J., Chance, S. A., DeLuca, G. C., Esiri, M. M., Chang, E.-H., Palace, J. A., McNab, J. A., Jenkinson, M., Miller, K. L. and Johansen-Berg, H. 2012. A combined post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histological study of multiple sclerosis pathology. Brain: A Journal of Neurology 135 (10) , pp. 2938-2951. 10.1093/brain/aws242

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Abstract

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory neurological condition characterized by focal and diffuse neurodegeneration and demyelination throughout the central nervous system. Factors influencing the progression of pathology are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that anatomical connectivity influences the spread of neurodegeneration. This predicts that measures of neurodegeneration will correlate most strongly between interconnected structures. However, such patterns have been difficult to quantify through post-mortem neuropathology or in vivo scanning alone. In this study, we used the complementary approaches of whole brain post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histology to assess patterns of multiple sclerosis pathology. Two thalamo-cortical projection systems were considered based on their distinct neuroanatomy and their documented involvement in multiple sclerosis: lateral geniculate nucleus to primary visual cortex and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to prefrontal cortex. Within the anatomically distinct thalamo-cortical projection systems, magnetic resonance imaging derived cortical thickness was correlated significantly with both a measure of myelination in the connected tract and a measure of connected thalamic nucleus cell density. Such correlations did not exist between these markers of neurodegeneration across different thalamo-cortical systems.Magnetic resonance imaging lesion analysis depicted clearly demarcated subcortical lesions impinging on the white matter tracts of interest; however, quantitation of the extent of lesion-tract overlap failed to demonstrate any appreciable association with the severity of markers of diffuse pathology within each thalamo-cortical projection system. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging metrics in both white matter tracts were correlated significantly with a histologically derived measure of tract myelination. These data demonstrate for the first time the relevance of functional anatomical connectivity to the spread of multiple sclerosis pathology in a ‘tract-specific’ pattern. Furthermore, the persisting relationship between metrics from post-mortem diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histological measures from fixed tissue further validates the potential of imaging for future neuropathological studies.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords: multiple sclerosis; post-mortem imaging; diffusion imaging; white matter tracts; neurodegeneration
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISSN: 0006-8950
Date of Acceptance: 20 July 2012
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 09:44
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/98847

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